Why Is Creon The Tragic Hero Essay

Creon Is a Tragic Hero Essay

1492 Words6 Pages

The Hero, Creon
Aristotle once said, regarding his principles that a certain character is a tragic hero, "A man cannot become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall." This quotation is an accurate statement regarding the actions between Creon in the beginning of the play, and at the end once he has lost his family. A tragic hero is defined as a character of noble stature, the hero is imperfect allowing the audience to relate to him, as well as the hero’s downfall is caused by his own fate, leading to the punishment exceeding the crime and the character’s realization leading to the fall. The audience experiences a catharsis at the end of the play, which allows the audience feel that society is “right” again. All six of…show more content…

The Hero, Creon
Aristotle once said, regarding his principles that a certain character is a tragic hero, "A man cannot become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall." This quotation is an accurate statement regarding the actions between Creon in the beginning of the play, and at the end once he has lost his family. A tragic hero is defined as a character of noble stature, the hero is imperfect allowing the audience to relate to him, as well as the hero’s downfall is caused by his own fate, leading to the punishment exceeding the crime and the character’s realization leading to the fall. The audience experiences a catharsis at the end of the play, which allows the audience feel that society is “right” again. All six of these requirements of a tragic hero are present with the character, Creon, and it presents to readers that Creon is a tragic hero.
Creon was recently appointed the King of Thebes, or the highest nobility position in the country of Thebes. Not only was he made King by the fates that followed Eteocles and Polynices, but he was born into the ruling family of Thebes. Creon’s parent, Menoeceus, was the offspring of the founder of Thebes. It was in his blood to eventually rule Thebes. In the play, an example of how Creon demonstrated his authoritative power is when he is talking with his son, Haemon, “But whoever steps out of line, violates the laws, or presumes to hand out orders to his superiors, he’ll win no praise from me. But that man the

Show More

Show More

Over time, history has given society many to whom we call true heroes. There are many reasons these heroes have been looked up to such as: bravery, dedication, confidence, and inspiration. However, a tragic hero requires a few different qualities. Aristotle describes a tragic hero as a “member of royalty,” someone who “must fall from tremendous good fortune,” and someone who creates pity for him or herself (“Connections: A Theory” 2000). In Greek drama, Sophocles’ Antigone and Euripides’ Medea both contain several possible tragic heroes including Medea, Jason, and Creon. More specifically, in Antigone Creon exemplifies the qualities of a tragic hero best due to his prominent power as king of Thebes, the way he holds strong to his…show more content…

With Creon’s strength in reigning over Thebes, he develops a tragic flaw of stubborn pride; Medea and Jason’s tragic flaws fall short to the prominent flaw of Creon. All tragic heroes must exhibit a tragic flaw. In Medea, Jason and Medea share a common tragic flaw—selfishness. Because of Medea’s devotion to loving Jason many years ago, she left her family and her home to follow him, even killing her own brother. This begins Medea’s lifestyle of thinking of no one but herself. In following with Jason and Medea’s story, Jason leaves Medea to marry Megareus because he desires to marry into a royal family instead of Medea’s barbaric lifestyle. His self-centered choice in marriage angers Medea to the point of ultimate loathing. Medea even goes so far as to poison Megareus through the misleading gift of a robe and crown. In the final scenes of Medea, Medea kills her and Jason’s two children because her raging anger towards Jason is stronger than the love for her children. Medea, an “unhappy woman” makes an act to condemn Jason for his selfishness in leaving her, but she does not realize that in her “harsh murder” of her own children, she too is acting selfishly (Medea 1496). Creon first introduces his tragic flaw by metaphorically explaining that the “ship of state” has “come safely to harbor at last” (Antigone 1.8-10). This statement proves Creon’s pride in himself that his ruling alone will bring about a peaceful time.

0 thoughts on “Why Is Creon The Tragic Hero Essay

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *